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English Classes

 English Classes

 



English as a Second Language courses:

ESL Fundamentals A

  • 9th Grade
  • Required
  • One Semester
ESL Fundamentals A is for newcomer English learners. This course provides students with beginner exposure to English in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Assessments and instruction incorporate strategies for meeting the needs of students that are beginning language learners and are aligned with the Common Core State Standards and National Geographic's Fundamentals. Enrollment in Fundamentals is dependent upon WIDA scores and teacher recommendation.

ESL Fundamentals B

  • 9th Grade
  • Required
  • One Semester
ESL Fundamentals A is for newcomer English learners. This course is a continuation of ESL Fundamentals A and provides students with beginner exposure to English in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Assessments and instruction incorporate strategies for meeting the needs of students that are beginning language learners and are aligned with the Common Core State Standards and National Geographic's Fundamentals. Enrollment in Fundamentals is dependent upon WIDA scores and teacher recommendation.

ESL English 1A

  • 9th Grade
  • Required
  • One Semester
English 1A for English learners is a one semester required course. The course provides students with a broad experience in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Assessments and instruction incorporate strategies for meeting the needs of students that are language learners and are aligned with the Common Core State Standards and National Geographic's Edge, level A.

ESL English 1B

  • 9th Grade

  • Required

  • One Semester

English 1B for English learners is a one semester required course. The course provides students with a broad experience in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Assessments and instruction incorporate strategies for meeting the needs of students that are language learners and are aligned with the Common Core State Standards and National Geographic's Edge, level A.

ESL English 2A

  • 10th Grade
  • Required
  • One Semester
English 2A for language learners is a one-semester required course in the ELA curriculum which focuses on a variety of literature, including short stories, nonfiction, poetry, an assigned novel, and novels of student choice. They will learn to evaluate text, expand personal beliefs, and determine the importance of empowering people through knowledge. This coursewill develop the student's reading and writing skills, aligned with the Common Core State Standards and National Geographic's Edge, level B.

ESL English 2B

  • 10th Grade
  • Required
  • One Semester
English 2B for English learners is a one-semester required course in the ELA curriculum which focuses on a variety of literature, including short stories, nonfiction, poetry, an assigned novel, and novels of student choice. This semester-long course also focuses on the research process. This course will develop the student's reading and writing skills, aligned with the Common Core State Standards and National Geographic's Edge, level B.

ESL English 3A

  • 11th Grade
  • Required
  • One Semester
ESL English 3A is a one-semester required course in the ELA curriculum tailored for English Learner students. This class focuses on a variety of literature, including short stories, nonfiction, poetry, and and novels. This course will develop the student's reading and writing skills, aligned with the Common Core State Standards and National Geographic's Edge, level B and other Board approved materials.

ESL English 3B

  • 11th Grade
  • Required
  • One Semester
ESL English 3A is a one-semester required course in the ELA curriculum tailored for English Learner students. This class focuses on a variety of literature, including short stories, nonfiction, poetry, and and novels. This course will develop the student's reading and writing skills, aligned with the Common Core State Standards and National Geographic's Edge, level B and other Board approved materials.

English 1

  1. 9th grade
  2. Required
  3. Two Semesters


English 1 is a two semester course required for graduation.   With English 1, students learn to connect fiction and non-fiction to themselves, to the world, and to other texts. By the end of the English 1, students are expected to read at or near grade-level, to be able to use literature and non-fiction to support opinions, and to write clearly in a variety of genres so they can readily move on to English 2. Many students enter English 1 claiming they do not like to read, but most of them leave with a renewed love of books.

English 1, Honors

  1. 9th grade
  2. Required/Elective
  3. Two Semesters
  4. Required Summer Work. Students who fail to complete summer work will be given a zero in the grade book. They will not be dropped from the course. Students may not drop the course after the drop/add period. 
  5. Required background:  The successful completion of an application process and signed approval from the previous English teacher.  Students may substitute this course for English I.


English 1 Honors is a course designed for students who are able to work independently and handle a more rigorous workload at an accelerated pace. Honors students are required to read three books the summer before beginning the class; the students select all three books, with one of them being a “challenge” book. Instruction takes place in a competitive academic environment and it is the expectation that students will complete work that consistently meets or exceeds expectations, turn in all work on time, and demonstrate proficiency in the basic language areas. Students in the honors course will be expected to complete assignments and achieve objectives in addition to those of English I.


Honors Frequently Asked  Questions

Honors Summer Reading Assignment


 

English 2

  • 10th grade
  • Required
  • Two Semesters
  • Required background:  English I

English II is a two-term required course in the English Language Arts curriculum.  Students must pass English I (both A and B) to enroll in English II.  The goal for this course is to continue to build a solid foundation of knowledge, skills, and strategies that will be refined, applied, and extended as students engage in more complex ideas, texts, and tasks.  In English II, students will read texts from the canon of American Literature, including classic and contemporary narrative and informational texts.  English II students will connect with and respond to texts through critical response and stance.  They will learn to evaluate for validity and quality, to balance and expand their perspectives promoting empathy, social action, and appropriate use of power.  Critical response and stance offers students the lens to assess and modify their beliefs, views of the world, and how they have the power to impact them.

   

English 2, Honors

  • 10th grade
  • Required/Elective
  • Two Semesters
  • Required Summer Work. Students who fail to complete summer work will be given a zero in the grade book. They will not be dropped from the course. Students may not drop the course after the drop/add period.
  • Required background:  English I and the successful completion of an application process along with signed approval of the English I teacher.  Students may substitute this course for English II.

This course is designed for the self-motivated student who desires a more in-depth handling of the material covered in the general English II course.  Instruction takes place in a competitive academic environment with the expectation that students will complete work that consistently meets or exceeds expectations, turn in all work on time, and demonstrate proficiency in the basic language arts developmental areas.  This course moves at an accelerated pace.  Students in the honors course will be expected to complete assignments and achieve objectives in addition to those of English II. *Note: Students must complete summer reading and writing in order to enroll in Honors English 2.

English 2 Honors Summer Reading Assignment


English 3

  • 11th grade
  • Required
  • Two Semesters
  • Required background:  Successful completion of English I and English II.

English III is a required course in the English Language Arts curriculum.  Students must pass English I (both A and B) and English II (A and B) to enroll in this course.  The goal for English III is to continue to build a solid foundation of knowledge, skills, and strategies that will be refined, applied, and extended as students engage in more complex ideas, texts, and tasks.  English III focuses on readings in world literature. In English III, students will build on the basic writing skills learned in English I and English II, continuing to improve their writing in narrative, informative, and argumentative genres, expand their knowledge of research and documentation, and develop public speaking and presentation skills. Students will read a variety of both fiction and nonfiction texts with a special focus on preparation for the SAT exam in the spring.



English 4 

Students may choose two courses from the list below.  Students may take two literature and composition courses (Column A) OR one literature and composition course (Column A) and one composition course (Column B) to fulfill the English 4 graduation requirement.

 


 

  

The American Experience

  • 11-12th grades
  • English 4/Elective
  • One Semester
  • Required background: Two years of high school English

This course offers students an opportunity to explore the American identity through a wide variety of fiction and non-fiction readings.  Emphasis is on each student's individual response to recurring themes that are a part of American life. Literature studied is from American writers, 1900 to present.  Included in the course are many opportunities to write and to speak about issues that help to define each student's personal experience.

Major goals for the student:

1.     Increase each student’s interest in reading about ideas that are a part of everyday American life.

2.     Recognize that literature reflects the life of the American culture:  its beliefs, values, and traditions.

3.     Discover values which shape each student’s personal existence.

4.     Respond to readings about American life in a variety of ways.

5.     Use all steps of the writing process when writing about literature.

6.     Practice and refine reading comprehension skills.

  


British Literature

11-12th grade
Elective
One Semester
Required background: Three years of high school English.

This course surveys the contributions of major British writers and develops an appreciation and understanding of significant selections in British literature. Students analyze literature thoughtfully and recognize the influence of British writers on world literature.

Major goals for the student:

1. Understand the chronology if ideas within a series of classical writings in British literature.

2. Study significant British writers who expressed the values, traditions, and thinking of each historical period—from the Anglo Saxon period to modern times.

3. Recognize the impact that British writing has had on the writing of the world.

4. Analyze literature objectively, understanding that writers’ reactions to their changing worlds are personal and emotional.
5. Use the writing process to respond thoughtfully and effectively to literature.


For Course Description Website:

Freelan$e Writing 

  • 12th grades
  • English 4/Elective
  • One Semester
  • Required background:  Be 17 or 18

This writing-intensive course that teaches students how to write for online clients in the lucrative world of freelance writing. Students will learn to write product descriptions, blogs, content for websites, and product reviews. They will learn to effectively communicate with clients. They will also work on earning certification in Inbound Marketing through Hubspot. They will also build an "About Me" website to use as an online resume. The ultimate goal is for students to get hired as freelance writers. 

 

Major goals for the student:

1.     Learn to write in a variety of forms for an online audience.

2.     Learn to work with clients all over the world.

3.      Learn to use the Internet to complete research for clients.

4.   Learn to write quickly and efficiently to meet deadlines.

5.     Earn writing certification to improve chances of getting hired. 


Humanities


11-12th grades
English 4/Elective
One Semester
Required background: English I and English II.

This course surveys a variety of answers to the question, "What does it mean to be human?" Answers are found in literature, art, music, and philosophy. Students examine historical and contemporary issues and explore various viewpoints. The Humanities course may be used as an English Language Arts or Social Studies half-credit.


Major goals for the student:

1. Increase understanding of the diverse ways in which humans respond to the world around them.

2. Examine historical and contemporary issues and explore how the viewpoints of various thinkers, writers, and artists apply.

3. Recognize that the responses of artists, writers, and philosophers to their worlds are personal and emotional.

4. Discover how contemporary issues give shape to personal values.




Mythology

  • 10-12th grades
  • English 4/Elective
  • One Semester
  • Required background: English I

This reading-intensive course is open to students who expect to attend college and who read at grade level or above. Literature selections include Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Oedipus Rex, and Edith Hamilton’s Mythology.

Major goals for the student:
Identify ancient mythological deities and their function in the daily life of ancient Greece.
Identify the elements of ancient myths, hero stories, and love stories.
Develop an understanding of the relationship between mythology and culture, both in Ancient Greece and in our modern world.


Reading and Writing Workshop

  • Some sections will be offered as On-Line Learning: Blended Class
  • 11-12th grades
  • English 4/Elective
  • One Semester
  • Required background: Two years of high school English.

This course offers students of all ability levels the opportunity to read and respond to literature of all genres. Based on an individual’s ability, he or she may select fiction and nonfiction that have personal appeal. Conferencing, journaling, and student-driven contracts are among the methods used for accountability and evaluation.

 

Major goals for the student:

1.     Enjoy reading as a leisure-time and learning activity.

2.     Gain independence in developing a personal reading program.

3.     Discover values that shape the meaning of every person’s life.

4.     Respond to literature in a variety of ways, including the recording of ideas in a journal, one-on-one conferences, small group discussions, and literary critiques.

5.    Use reading and writing about literature as vehicles for learning.


AP English Language

  • 10-12th grades
  • Elective
  • Two Semesters
  • Required Summer Work. Students who fail to complete summer work will be given a zero in the grade book. They will not be dropped from the course. Students may not drop the course after the drop/add period.
  • Required background: English I or English I, Honors; English II or English II, Honors; GPA 3.0 +, teacher recommendation.
  • This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college freshman English and writing course.  With a curriculum approved by the Advanced Placement Board, this class not only prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Language and Composition exam, but the course also teaches strategies for advanced rhetorical analyses, hones students’ writing skills, and makes them more aware of the nuances of language and argument.  Through our close study of both classic and contemporary nonfiction pieces, students will:

    Major goals for the student:

    1. Sharpen their analytical writing and reading skills by engaging in vocabulary study, rigorous class discussion and small group activities.
    2. Analyze pieces of writing (their own and others’) for rhetorical effectiveness.
    3.  Recognize flawed arguments and logical fallacies.
    4.  Identify and employ syntax (sentence structure) that affects meaning through grammar, pacing, and word choice.

     

    Extensive writing, reading, grammar study, and independent thought are expectations of this accelerated course. *Note: Students must complete summer reading and writing in order to enroll in AP English Language and Composition.

    AP English Language Summer Reading Requirements

    AP English Language Syllabus

     

    AP English Literature and Composition

    • 11th-12th grades (not recommended for 10th grade students)
    • Elective
    • Two Semesters
    • Required Summer Work. Students who fail to complete summer work will be given a zero in the grade book. They will not be dropped from the course. Students may not drop the course after the drop/add period.
    • Required background: English I or English I Honors; English II or English II Honors

    This course offers a comprehensive study of major world and British writers and prepares students to take the AP Literature and Composition Exam. Students will develop skill in literary and social criticism and study the advanced levels of writing style and technique that will be important for college. *Note: Students must complete summer reading and writing in order to enroll in AP English Literature and Composition.

    Major goals for the student:

    1.     Understand the chronology of ideas within a series of classical writings in world and British literature.

    2.     Study significant world and British writers who expressed the values, traditions, and thinking of each historical period—from the 16th century to the modern era.

    3.     Develop critical standards for literary analysis.

    4.     Sharpen an awareness of language use and the writer’s craft.

    5.     Use the writing process to respond thoughtfully and effectively to literature.

    AP English Literature and Composition Summer Reading

    AP English Literature and Composition Syllabus

    AP English Literature and Composition Major Works Data Sheet

     

    IB English HL

    • 11th-12th grades
    • Four Semesters

    English 1 and 2 (HL) are required for all students enrolled in the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (DP).  Students enrolled will take this comprehensive study of World Literature during their junior and senior years, culminating with the IB exams in May.  Students will read and thoughtfully analyze literature from different cultures, languages and time periods with an understanding that even through this diversity we recognize universality in the human condition.  Assessments will be both internal and external and involve both written and oral analysis.  The works of literature are recommended by the International Baccalaureate Organization and comparable to college level texts and, as such, contain mature themes and language.

    IB English Summer Reading List


    Creative Writing

    • 10-12th grades
    • English 4/Elective
    • One Semester
    • Required background:  English IA and IB

    This writing-intensive course emphasizes the writing process and develops skills in writing prose and poetry.  Students are encouraged to use imaginative language, fresh ideas, and divergent thinking; to view the world from a different perspective; and to develop the writer’s voice.

     

    Major goals for the student:

    1.     Develop techniques to write effectively and artistically.

    2.     Develop appreciation for the writing workshop process and sharing writing with an audience.

    3.     Use all steps of the writing process.

    4.     Explore the writer’s craft in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction in various modes and genres, including narratives, character sketches, descriptions, short stories, sudden fiction, essays, free verse, and structured poetry.

    5.     Use conventions to clarify meaning, including comma and semicolon use, proper dialogue punctuation, paragraphing, capitalization, sentence structure, correct word usage and consistent use of tense.


     

    Expository Writing


    12th grade
    English 4/Elective
    One Semester
    Required background: Three years of high school English.


    This course strengthens student writing for the next level beyond high school by exploring different purposes for writing and analyzing models of effective writing in various formats. Students work through all steps of the writing process. Emphasis is on developing students’ ability to write organized and focused essays with strong details. Grammar is individualized based on each student’s strengths and weaknesses.


    Major goals for the student:

    1. Organization, focus, and details in different types of essays.

    2. Be able to recognize and construct an effective paragraph.

    3. Develop the ability to compare and contrast, define, and analyze.

    4. Study various forms of writing style for different purposes.

    5. Learn and practice the techniques of academic research and documentation.

    6. Develop an independent technique for planning, drafting, and revising formal writing.

    7. Practice writing in various forms for use beyond high school including: informative writing, persuasive writing, descriptive writing, and business writing.


      

    Advanced Expository Writing

    • Some sections may be offered as On-Line Leaning – Blended Course
    • 12th grade
    • English 4/Elective
    • One Semester
    • Required background:  Three years of high school English.

     

    This course prepares students for college writing by exploring different purposes for writing and analyzing models of effective writing in various formats. Students work through all steps of the writing process. Emphasis is on developing students’ research skills, writing styles, and voice.

     

    Major goals for the student:

    1.     Identify and use logic, organization, focus, and coherence in the essay form.

    2.     Develop the ability to compare and contrast, define, and analyze.

    3.     Develop techniques in social criticism.

    4.      Study advanced levels of writing style.

    5.      Master advanced techniques of academic research and documentation.

    6.     Become disciplined in the approach to effective writing

    7.      Develop an appreciation of formal diction and style in preparation for college courses in any field.

     

     Journalistic Writing

    • 9th-12th grades
    • English 4/Elective
    • One or two semesters
    • This course is run like a business, with students in charge of producing our school newspaper, the West Ottawan.  Students produce four or five editions of the paper in each semester.  Students decide the content of the paper and make editorial decisions.     Meeting deadlines is essential to success in the course.


     Advanced Broadcast Journalism 

    • 12th Grade
    • English 4B/Elective
    • One semester
    • Required background: Three years of English and Intro to Broadcast Journalism
    • This course meets the VPAA and senior English 4B requirement toward graduation
    This course gives students the opportunity to polish their broadcast journalism skills through a variety of advanced projects.  Significant time will be spent on the process of planning videos and programs, including writing and research.  Students will compile all of their work on a personally created web presence.  Students will at times have the ability to focus work on a specific skill or area of interest for contests, college admittance, and/or scholarships.

    Major goals for the student:
    1. Students will become critical consumers of broadcast journalism
    2. Students will develop methods in pre-production writing and research
    3. Students will advance their skills in video editing and television production
    4. Students will create a variety of video products and produce a variety of television programs
    5. Students will investigate and evaluate the impact of new technologies and social media on broadcast journalism as well as themselves
    6. Students will create a professional digital footprint and online portfolio. 

     

    YouTube Video


    Introduction to Broadcast Journalism

    • 9th-12th grades
    • Elective
    • One Semester
    • Required background:  It is required that students interested in becoming WOBN team members complete Introduction to Broadcast Journalism with a “B-“or better.
    • NOTE:  Credit in this course does NOT count toward the four credits of English required for graduation.
    • This course meets the VPAA requirement toward graduation

    This course is designed to introduce students to the techniques and disciplines associated with television news and television production. Students will be introduced to broadcast journalism through assignments grounded in research, writing, speaking, and technology.  Students will become critical viewers, consumers, and producers of media. Students will gain technical experience in the WOBN broadcast studio.  Students may only take this course one time.

     

     

    Major goals for the student:

    1.     Recognize that media has a huge impact on society.

    2.     Understand the video production process required to broadcast a news program.

    3.     Understand the process of news gathering and reporting by creating news packages.

    4.     Write for television using a news writing style.

    5.     Develop on-camera speaking techniques needed for a variety of formats.

    6.     Learn to operate all studio equipment, including cameras, video switcher, editing and audio equipment, character generator, and lighting.


     

    Broadcast Journalism

    • 10th-12th grades
    • Elective
    • Two Semesters
    • Required background:  A completed application, teacher recommendations, and approval of course instructor are required.  Also, students must complete Introduction to Broadcast Journalism with a “B-“or better.
    • NOTE:  Credit in this course does NOT count toward the four credits of English required for graduation.
    • This course meets the VPAA requirement toward graduation

    WOBN team members will become critical viewers and producers of media.  This course offers instruction and experience in the techniques and disciplines associated with television news and production.  Students will produce West Ottawa High School's daily news and seminar programming through the WOBN in-house channel. Students will also serve on production crews for various district events. The ability to meet deadlines is essential.  Students may take this course more than one time.

     

    Major goals for the student:

     

    1.     Understand the video production process required to broadcast a news program on a daily basis.

    2.     Understand the process of news gathering and reporting by creating news packages.

    3.     Write for television using a news writing style.

    4.     Develop on-camera speaking techniques needed for a variety of formats.

    5.     Learn to operate all studio equipment, including cameras, video switcher, editing and audio equipment, character generator, and lighting.

    6.     Work well with all WOBN team members and recognize that each person brings a variety of talent to the team.

    7.    Recognize WOBN’s role as a responsible, ethical, and professional news organization whose overall purpose is to provide accurate, artful, and professional presentation of West Ottawa school news.


    Annuals Journalism

    • 10th-12th grades
    • Elective
    • Two Semesters
    • Required background:  Teacher recommendation; satisfactory attendance record; satisfactory grades in writing classes; approval of course instructor; completed Icon application.
    • NOTE:  Credit in this course does NOT count toward the four credits of English required for graduation.
    • This course is designed to produce and publish the high school yearbook, the Icon.   Students learn and practice all aspects of publication design and production.  Annuals Journalism develops a wide variety of reading, writing, artistic, and technical skills.
    • This course meets the VPAA requirement toward graduation

     

    Major goals for the student:

    1.     Practice and perfect the language skills used in journalistic writing.

    2.     Learn the overall purposes of school publications; the organization and responsibilities necessary to produce them; and the writing, editing, and layout skills involved.

    3.     Learn the methods, skills, and purposes of advertising and marketing as ways of financing and distributing the yearbook.

    4.     Learn to operate cameras, choose subjects, compose pictures, develop black and white photographs, and select and adapt pictures and act work for use in publications.

    5.     Learn to conceptualize, plan, and execute major journalistic projects.

    6.     Learn to use the technology off desktop publishing: copy entry and editing, computer graphics, and text and graphics integration.

    7.     Students will practice and develop questioning and interviewing skills

    YouTube Video

     

      

    Debate

    • 9th-12th grades
    • Elective
    • One Semester
    • Note: This course may be taken only one time. 

    This course focuses on the development of the following skills: public speaking, interpersonal communications, research techniques, analysis of information, processing and responding to arguments, reading and writing analogies, and “flowing” (the recording of an argument in a systematic manner).  The course requires the student to work with a partner in research and problem solving activities.  The course also provides students with the opportunity to analyze problems and develop plans of action leading to effective solutions.  The student will be exposed to a variety of debate styles, including policy debate and legislative debate. Debate encourages students to think with logical structure and to speak in a direct and convincing manner.

     

    Students in this class will be expected to speak often in front of the class and other audience.

     

    Major goals for the student:

    1.     Develop confidence in public speaking skills.

    2.     Investigate and analyze a current social, economic, or political topic.

    3.     Research the topic and then develop logical positions that support and negate it.

    4.     Present and defend positions in a structured debate format.

    5.     Develop the ability to collect and organize ideas, evaluate evidence, perceive logical connections, think and speak in a reasoned manner by linking ideas together, express positions persuasively, and adapt to new ideas and information quickly.


    More information about Debate


     

    Advanced Debate

    • 9th-11th grades
    • Elective
    • One Semester
    • Note: This course may ONLY be taken after successful completion of Debate. 

    This course is designed for students interested in participating in competitive debate.  Through the course, students will increase their knowledge and skills in debate theory, debate techniques, and methods of becoming successful competitors.  Students should expect to travel to tournament in order to assess their debate skills and to hone their techniques.  The class will improve their skills in research, argument construction, speaking style, and forms of refutation.  Students enrolling in this class will be expected to participate as members of the West Ottawa High School Debate Team and may be expected to attend an appropriate number of debate tournaments during a semester.

     

    Upon successful completion of the class, students should be able to:

    1.     Describe the importance of Debate in our society.

    2.     Use all aspects of research, including government documents and library research methods..

    3.     Develop the means by which to structure an argument, find proof of the argument, and answer attacks through refutation.

    4.    Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the topic area debated for the current debate season.

    5.    Develop and apply critical thinking methods in debate rounds.

    6.    Deliver constructive and rebuttal speeches effectively.

    7.    Participate in the various styles of competitive debate, including Lincoln/Douglas.

    8.    Explore current theoretical issues in debate.

    9.    Refine argumentation skills throughout tournament competition.

    10. Attend and compete in a debate league – all debate rounds required by that league.

     

     


    Theater I/Forensics(Fundamentals)

    • 10-12th grades
    • Elective
    • One Semester
    • Note: Theater I/Forensics may be repeated three times with a “B” or better in the previous class.  Students can earn .5 arts credit toward VPAA certification in this course. 

    This creative course provides instruction and practice in stage acting and in the interpretation of literature.  Actual performances in front of other students are a part of this class.  Students must be able to work well with others on theater games and class participation.

     

    Major goals for the student:

    1.     Learn to participate in creative theater games.

    2.     Learn to create characters in stories and plays.

    3.     Develop basic acting skills.

    4.     Learn to create characters for basic storytelling and pantomime.

    5.     Learn to evaluate other student performances.

    6.     Learn basic theater and storytelling history.

     

     

    Theater II/Forensics

    • 10-12th grades
    • Elective
    • One Semester
    • Required background:  A final grade of “B” or better in Theater I, and/or permission from the instructor.  Theater II can be taken up to three times with a “B” or better in the previous class and with written permission from the instructor.
    • NOTE:  Students can earn .5 arts credit toward VPAA certification in this course.

    This advanced theater course prepares students to enter a college theater program with the skills needed to succeed in both the technical and performance areas.  Emphasis will be on critical reading and performance of dramatic literature and stage acting and public speaking.  Students will be expected to create and deliver a sales speech and an informative speech. The academic expectations and work load of this class are high.  Repeating Theater II students will focus on the design and performances of the Theatre Caravan production.

    Major goals for the student:

    1.     Read and analyze a wide variety of dramatic literature.

    2.     Design or build a set for a one-act play.

    3.     Design the sound effects for a one-act play

    4.     Design a make-up and costume for a play.

    5.     Prepare and perform scenes from a published play.

    6.     Write and deliver two major speeches.


    Debate

    This is the new description for Debate. 

     

    Major goals for the student:

    1.     Learn responsible and ethical journalistic standards.

    2.     Develop the skills to write and edit publishable material.

    3.     Develop research and interviewing skills.

    4.     Extensively read/study journalistic writing.

    5.     Develop interpersonal communication skills.

          6.    Learn to use the technology required to produce the newspaper.